Mortal History

Below is a basic timeline of Detroit history that is readily available to any person doing research on the subject. Much of this is taught in public schools. Please Note: This information is taken from Wikipedia and should be verifiable as “real world” history.

  • 1670: French missionaries Francois Dollier de Casson and Rene Brehant de Galinee stop at the site of what will one day be Detroit on their way to the mission at Sault Ste. Marie. They found a stone idol that was venerated by the local Native Americans. The idol was destroyed with an axe and the pieces were dropped into the river.
  • 1701: July 24, Antoine de Lamothe Cadillac, with his lieutenant Alphonse de Tonty and a company of 100 men, establishes a trading post on the Detroit River under orders from the French King Louis XIV. They named it Fort Pontchartrain du D├ętroit, in homage to the Count of Pontchartrain, the Royal Minister of Marine. Ste. Anne de Detroit Catholic Church is the first building built in Detroit, started within two days of Cadillac’s landing.
  • 1760: Major Robert Rogers and a group of his Rogers’ Rangers take formal command of Fort Detroit in the name of Great Britain after the French defeat in the French and Indian War.
  • 1763: Chief Pontiac besieges Detroit during Pontiac’s Rebellion.
  • 1796: American control over Detroit is established, thirteen years after it was assigned by treaty to the United States at the end of the American Revolutionary War.
  • 1802: February 1, the town of Detroit is incorporated by the territorial legislature.
  • 1805: June 11, a fire burns virtually the entire city. The city’s motto, Speramus meliora; resurget cineribus (“We hope for better things, it will rise from the ashes”) dates from this event.
  • 1806: September 13, the city of Detroit is incorporated by the territorial governing council.
  • 1809: February 24, the territorial governing council repeals the 1806 incorporation of the city.
  • 1812: August 16, Detroit surrenders without firing a shot to British army under General Isaac Brock in the War of 1812.
  • 1813: September, The British retreat from Detroit, which served as a base for the invasion of Canada.
  • 1815: October 24, the territorial governing council enacts the charter for the City of Detroit to be governed by a five-person board of trustees.
  • 1824: August 5, the newly formed territorial legislature reorganizes city government, creating the Common Council and office of mayor.
  • 1837: Detroit becomes capital of the State of Michigan (until 1847).
  • 1837 to 1838: Small bands of self-proclaimed “Patriots”, some operating from Detroit, invade Canada in the Patriot War.
  • 1863: Anti-draft and race riot in Detroit.
  • 1890: Reforming mayor Hazen Pingree establishes vegetable gardens for the poor, which came to be called Pingree’s Potato Patches.
  • 1903: Ford Motor Company is founded by Henry Ford in Detroit.
  • 1929: Ambassador Bridge construction complete.
  • 1930: Detroit-Windsor Tunnel construction complete.
  • 1943: A race riot, spurred by competition among black and white residents for wartime factory jobs, resulted in 34 deaths.
  • 1961: Jerome Cavanagh is elected mayor and launches a series of reforms.
  • 1963: Great March to Freedom.
  • 1967: On July 23, the 12th Street Riot, one of the worst riots in United States history, begins on 12th Street in the predominantly African American inner city (43 killed, 342 injured and 1,400 buildings burned).
  • 1968: Focus: HOPE organization is founded by Fr. William Cunningham. The Detroit Tigers defeat the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series in seven games.
  • 1973: Coleman Young is elected Detroit’s first black mayor — a position he would hold for 20 years.
  • 1979-1980: Saddam Hussein makes large donations to a Detroit church and receives a key to the city. Hussein’s relationship with Detroit began in 1979, when the Reverend Jacob Yasso of Chaldean Sacred Heart congratulated Hussein on his presidency. Yasso said that in return his church had received $450,000 from the former Iraqi dictator.
  • 1980: The national economic malaise of the 1970s culminated in Detroit hosting the Republican National Convention which nominated Ronald Reagan who stayed at the Renaissance Center while in Detroit. The Detroit convention kicked off Reagan’s campaign to a landslide election.
  • 1987: Pope John Paul II visits Detroit.
  • 1992: November 5, black motorist Malice Green dies after struggling with white policemen Larry Nevers and Walter Budzyn during a traffic stop. The officers were later convicted and sentenced to prison. The convictions were overturned, but the officers were retried and convicted of lesser charges.
  • 1996: In November, Michigan votes to allow the operation of three casinos in Detroit.
  • 2002: The Detroit Lions football team begin play in the new, state-of-the-art Ford Field, returning to downtown Detroit after 27 years in suburban Pontiac.
  • 2006: In February, the city hosts Super Bowl XL, and in October, the Detroit Tigers, only three years after having a 119-loss season, defeat the Oakland A’s in the American League Championship Series, winning the Penant. They then play in their first World Series since 1984, losing to their 1968 series rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals, in five games.
  • 2008: Kwame Kilpatrick resigns from office as mayor.

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Mortal History

Detroit By Night(Mage) meaux1